Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

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Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Casey Davis
Greetings!

I'm emailing you on behalf of the Association of Moving Image Archivists PBCore Advisory Subcommittee to gather feedback and suggestions on ontology development. PBCore was developed about 10 years ago by public broadcasters as an XML schema for managing metadata about video and audio. Since then, the schema has been revised multiple times and adopted by a number of archives and archivists in the moving image archival community.

The PBCore Advisory Subcommittee is working on schema improvements,  developing an RDF ontology for PBCore, and outreach and education to users and potential users and improving the website.

We are making some minor bug fixes and updates to the XML schema, as well as refining and improving our controlled vocabularies. PBCore 2.1 (XML schema) will launch in March 2015. Why continue to maintain an XML schema, you ask? Some PBCore users (public media stations and archives) may continue to use PBCore XML until they have the resources and are capable of moving to an RDF model for storing and managing their data.

Our next goal is to develop an RDF ontology for PBCore. I recently read Natasha Noy and Deborah McGuinness' "Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology" paper and found it extremely helpful. We will also explore using Protégé to build and edit the ontology. 

I am wondering if any of you have any suggestions for us as we transform an XML schema (82 elements, 30 attributes, and some controlled vocabularies, including descriptive, intellectual property, and technical metadata) into an ontology. Do you know of any others who have done this? I will be looking at the work done by the BIBFRAME initiative at the LOC and EBUCore, an AV metadata ontology created by Europeana. 

If you have any suggestions or recommendations for us as we begin this work, please do share them. Thank you for your time!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation 

[hidden email] | 617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135 


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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Tania Tudorache
Hi Casey,

You may want to check the existing multimedia vocabularies that have already been developed to see if you can reuse them. I know that a lot of effort has gone into them:

http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/mmsem/XGR-vocabularies/


If you need to import some external schemes into an ontology, it is very likely that no automatic import will create the intended semantic meaning. You may want to start from scratch (maybe reuse terms from existing vocabularies) with a clean conceptual model.

I would also suggest to use WebProtege (http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege) for creating the ontology rather than Protege desktop, as it has a much more user-friendly and easier-to-understand interface. WebProtege was created specially for users who are not ontology experts.

We will be offering at Stanford a 3-day course on ontologies, OWL and Protege in March 2015. We will publish the details shortly on the website. If you or anyone in the group is interested in atending, please contact me.

Best regards,
Tania

--
Tania Tudorache
Senior Research Scientist
Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
1265 Welch Rd.
Stanford, CA-94305
[hidden email]
http://www.stanford.edu/~ttania



On 11/12/2014 12:38 PM, Casey Davis wrote:
Greetings!

I'm emailing you on behalf of the Association of Moving Image Archivists PBCore Advisory Subcommittee to gather feedback and suggestions on ontology development. PBCore was developed about 10 years ago by public broadcasters as an XML schema for managing metadata about video and audio. Since then, the schema has been revised multiple times and adopted by a number of archives and archivists in the moving image archival community.

The PBCore Advisory Subcommittee is working on schema improvements,  developing an RDF ontology for PBCore, and outreach and education to users and potential users and improving the website.

We are making some minor bug fixes and updates to the XML schema, as well as refining and improving our controlled vocabularies. PBCore 2.1 (XML schema) will launch in March 2015. Why continue to maintain an XML schema, you ask? Some PBCore users (public media stations and archives) may continue to use PBCore XML until they have the resources and are capable of moving to an RDF model for storing and managing their data.

Our next goal is to develop an RDF ontology for PBCore. I recently read Natasha Noy and Deborah McGuinness' "Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology" paper and found it extremely helpful. We will also explore using Protégé to build and edit the ontology. 

I am wondering if any of you have any suggestions for us as we transform an XML schema (82 elements, 30 attributes, and some controlled vocabularies, including descriptive, intellectual property, and technical metadata) into an ontology. Do you know of any others who have done this? I will be looking at the work done by the BIBFRAME initiative at the LOC and EBUCore, an AV metadata ontology created by Europeana. 

If you have any suggestions or recommendations for us as we begin this work, please do share them. Thank you for your time!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation 

[hidden email] | 617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135 


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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Christian
In reply to this post by Casey Davis
I'm currently working on a similar project, trying to translate XSD-Schema files to OWL2.

I found the Rhizomik project (http://rhizomik.net/html/redefer/xsd2owl/) where they developed an methodology about how to map XSD to OWL2 (http://rhizomik.net/html/~roberto/thesis/html/Methodology.html#XMLSemanticsReuse). They also developed a rudimentary XSLT script to do that job. Maybe thoose information can help you in translating the XSD schema into RDF.

But actually, I had some problems using that XSLT script, especially if you have to deal with a bunch of XSD files that import/include each other, because thoose scripts only process a single time at once and therefore don't know what's defined in the other ones. It also seems to have some issues with namespaces. Therefore, I'm currently trying to develop a Java program that uses the OWL-API to translate my XSD-files all together, creating a new ontology for every used target namespace instead of a 1 to 1 translation.
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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Vayianos Pertsas
In reply to this post by Tania Tudorache
Hello,

Regarding the courses on ontologies, OWL and Protege, that you have at Stanford, is it possible to watch them online? I believe that there are a lot of us who would love to attend but can't afford the travel costs (I am staying in Greece). I think a payed webinar or even better an online course (in Coursera for instance) could be a good alternative.

Best regards and really looking forward to your answer,
Vayianos


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 2:51 AM, Tania Tudorache <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Casey,

You may want to check the existing multimedia vocabularies that have already been developed to see if you can reuse them. I know that a lot of effort has gone into them:

http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/mmsem/XGR-vocabularies/


If you need to import some external schemes into an ontology, it is very likely that no automatic import will create the intended semantic meaning. You may want to start from scratch (maybe reuse terms from existing vocabularies) with a clean conceptual model.

I would also suggest to use WebProtege (http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege) for creating the ontology rather than Protege desktop, as it has a much more user-friendly and easier-to-understand interface. WebProtege was created specially for users who are not ontology experts.

We will be offering at Stanford a 3-day course on ontologies, OWL and Protege in March 2015. We will publish the details shortly on the website. If you or anyone in the group is interested in atending, please contact me.

Best regards,
Tania

--
Tania Tudorache
Senior Research Scientist
Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
1265 Welch Rd.
Stanford, CA-94305
[hidden email]
http://www.stanford.edu/~ttania



On 11/12/2014 12:38 PM, Casey Davis wrote:
Greetings!

I'm emailing you on behalf of the Association of Moving Image Archivists PBCore Advisory Subcommittee to gather feedback and suggestions on ontology development. PBCore was developed about 10 years ago by public broadcasters as an XML schema for managing metadata about video and audio. Since then, the schema has been revised multiple times and adopted by a number of archives and archivists in the moving image archival community.

The PBCore Advisory Subcommittee is working on schema improvements,  developing an RDF ontology for PBCore, and outreach and education to users and potential users and improving the website.

We are making some minor bug fixes and updates to the XML schema, as well as refining and improving our controlled vocabularies. PBCore 2.1 (XML schema) will launch in March 2015. Why continue to maintain an XML schema, you ask? Some PBCore users (public media stations and archives) may continue to use PBCore XML until they have the resources and are capable of moving to an RDF model for storing and managing their data.

Our next goal is to develop an RDF ontology for PBCore. I recently read Natasha Noy and Deborah McGuinness' "Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology" paper and found it extremely helpful. We will also explore using Protégé to build and edit the ontology. 

I am wondering if any of you have any suggestions for us as we transform an XML schema (82 elements, 30 attributes, and some controlled vocabularies, including descriptive, intellectual property, and technical metadata) into an ontology. Do you know of any others who have done this? I will be looking at the work done by the BIBFRAME initiative at the LOC and EBUCore, an AV metadata ontology created by Europeana. 

If you have any suggestions or recommendations for us as we begin this work, please do share them. Thank you for your time!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation 

[hidden email] | <a href="tel:617-300-5921" value="+16173005921" target="_blank">617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135 


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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Tim Williams
I am also interested in the potential of a payed webinar or online course offering.  My travel budget is already stretched for 2015. Please consider this type of offering, especially given the levels of interest from outside of North America.

Please keep us posted!

Tim


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 5:08 AM, Vayianos Pertsas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,

Regarding the courses on ontologies, OWL and Protege, that you have at Stanford, is it possible to watch them online? I believe that there are a lot of us who would love to attend but can't afford the travel costs (I am staying in Greece). I think a payed webinar or even better an online course (in Coursera for instance) could be a good alternative.

Best regards and really looking forward to your answer,
Vayianos


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 2:51 AM, Tania Tudorache <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Casey,

You may want to check the existing multimedia vocabularies that have already been developed to see if you can reuse them. I know that a lot of effort has gone into them:

http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/mmsem/XGR-vocabularies/


If you need to import some external schemes into an ontology, it is very likely that no automatic import will create the intended semantic meaning. You may want to start from scratch (maybe reuse terms from existing vocabularies) with a clean conceptual model.

I would also suggest to use WebProtege (http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege) for creating the ontology rather than Protege desktop, as it has a much more user-friendly and easier-to-understand interface. WebProtege was created specially for users who are not ontology experts.

We will be offering at Stanford a 3-day course on ontologies, OWL and Protege in March 2015. We will publish the details shortly on the website. If you or anyone in the group is interested in atending, please contact me.

Best regards,
Tania

--
Tania Tudorache
Senior Research Scientist
Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
1265 Welch Rd.
Stanford, CA-94305
[hidden email]
http://www.stanford.edu/~ttania



On 11/12/2014 12:38 PM, Casey Davis wrote:
Greetings!

I'm emailing you on behalf of the Association of Moving Image Archivists PBCore Advisory Subcommittee to gather feedback and suggestions on ontology development. PBCore was developed about 10 years ago by public broadcasters as an XML schema for managing metadata about video and audio. Since then, the schema has been revised multiple times and adopted by a number of archives and archivists in the moving image archival community.

The PBCore Advisory Subcommittee is working on schema improvements,  developing an RDF ontology for PBCore, and outreach and education to users and potential users and improving the website.

We are making some minor bug fixes and updates to the XML schema, as well as refining and improving our controlled vocabularies. PBCore 2.1 (XML schema) will launch in March 2015. Why continue to maintain an XML schema, you ask? Some PBCore users (public media stations and archives) may continue to use PBCore XML until they have the resources and are capable of moving to an RDF model for storing and managing their data.

Our next goal is to develop an RDF ontology for PBCore. I recently read Natasha Noy and Deborah McGuinness' "Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology" paper and found it extremely helpful. We will also explore using Protégé to build and edit the ontology. 

I am wondering if any of you have any suggestions for us as we transform an XML schema (82 elements, 30 attributes, and some controlled vocabularies, including descriptive, intellectual property, and technical metadata) into an ontology. Do you know of any others who have done this? I will be looking at the work done by the BIBFRAME initiative at the LOC and EBUCore, an AV metadata ontology created by Europeana. 

If you have any suggestions or recommendations for us as we begin this work, please do share them. Thank you for your time!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation 

[hidden email] | <a href="tel:617-300-5921" value="+16173005921" target="_blank">617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135 


Subscribe to the American Archive blog

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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Ghislain ATEMEZING
Hi Casey,
I know of some other initiatives not far from your domain where you can look at...Here are the list of some work that might be interesting:
 - The EBU Core vocabulary by the European Broadcasting Union, with namespace http://www.ebu.ch/metadata/ontologies/ebucore/ebucore#. More details at http://lov.okfn.org/dataset/lov/details/vocabulary_ebucore.html.
 - As mentioned by Tania earlier, there is the Linked Open Vocabulary (LOV) catalogue [1] that keep track of vocabularies by domain. See here [2] for multimedia space to find how others (re)used terms in that particular domain. If instead you are looking at reusing specific term, just use the  search function for specific terms. For example, here http://lov.okfn.org/dataset/lov/search?q=multimedia you can see the results for the term "multimedia", filtered in different facets. 
Of course, you have access to many kind of metadata to contact the project/publisher of the ontology. 

HTH

Best,


El Tue Nov 18 2014 at 16:03:17, Tim Williams (<[hidden email]>) escribió:
I am also interested in the potential of a payed webinar or online course offering.  My travel budget is already stretched for 2015. Please consider this type of offering, especially given the levels of interest from outside of North America.

Please keep us posted!

Tim


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 5:08 AM, Vayianos Pertsas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,

Regarding the courses on ontologies, OWL and Protege, that you have at Stanford, is it possible to watch them online? I believe that there are a lot of us who would love to attend but can't afford the travel costs (I am staying in Greece). I think a payed webinar or even better an online course (in Coursera for instance) could be a good alternative.

Best regards and really looking forward to your answer,
Vayianos


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 2:51 AM, Tania Tudorache <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Casey,

You may want to check the existing multimedia vocabularies that have already been developed to see if you can reuse them. I know that a lot of effort has gone into them:

http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/mmsem/XGR-vocabularies/


If you need to import some external schemes into an ontology, it is very likely that no automatic import will create the intended semantic meaning. You may want to start from scratch (maybe reuse terms from existing vocabularies) with a clean conceptual model.

I would also suggest to use WebProtege (http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege) for creating the ontology rather than Protege desktop, as it has a much more user-friendly and easier-to-understand interface. WebProtege was created specially for users who are not ontology experts.

We will be offering at Stanford a 3-day course on ontologies, OWL and Protege in March 2015. We will publish the details shortly on the website. If you or anyone in the group is interested in atending, please contact me.

Best regards,
Tania

--
Tania Tudorache
Senior Research Scientist
Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
1265 Welch Rd.
Stanford, CA-94305
[hidden email]
http://www.stanford.edu/~ttania



On 11/12/2014 12:38 PM, Casey Davis wrote:
Greetings!

I'm emailing you on behalf of the Association of Moving Image Archivists PBCore Advisory Subcommittee to gather feedback and suggestions on ontology development. PBCore was developed about 10 years ago by public broadcasters as an XML schema for managing metadata about video and audio. Since then, the schema has been revised multiple times and adopted by a number of archives and archivists in the moving image archival community.

The PBCore Advisory Subcommittee is working on schema improvements,  developing an RDF ontology for PBCore, and outreach and education to users and potential users and improving the website.

We are making some minor bug fixes and updates to the XML schema, as well as refining and improving our controlled vocabularies. PBCore 2.1 (XML schema) will launch in March 2015. Why continue to maintain an XML schema, you ask? Some PBCore users (public media stations and archives) may continue to use PBCore XML until they have the resources and are capable of moving to an RDF model for storing and managing their data.

Our next goal is to develop an RDF ontology for PBCore. I recently read Natasha Noy and Deborah McGuinness' "Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology" paper and found it extremely helpful. We will also explore using Protégé to build and edit the ontology. 

I am wondering if any of you have any suggestions for us as we transform an XML schema (82 elements, 30 attributes, and some controlled vocabularies, including descriptive, intellectual property, and technical metadata) into an ontology. Do you know of any others who have done this? I will be looking at the work done by the BIBFRAME initiative at the LOC and EBUCore, an AV metadata ontology created by Europeana. 

If you have any suggestions or recommendations for us as we begin this work, please do share them. Thank you for your time!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation 

[hidden email] | <a href="tel:617-300-5921" value="+16173005921" target="_blank">617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135 


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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Tania Tudorache
In reply to this post by Tim Williams
Vayianos and Tim,

Thank you for the interest in the short-course! Currently, we do not have an online offering. The course is very interactive and most lectures are hands-on, with several exercises and group discussion, which would be quite hard to have in an online lecture. Unfortunately, we also have quite limited resources, and we focus them mostly on development and supporting the community. Once the situation changes, we'll be happy to consider also an online lecture.

Best regards,
Tania


On 11/18/2014 07:02 AM, Tim Williams wrote:
I am also interested in the potential of a payed webinar or online course offering.  My travel budget is already stretched for 2015. Please consider this type of offering, especially given the levels of interest from outside of North America.

Please keep us posted!

Tim


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 5:08 AM, Vayianos Pertsas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,

Regarding the courses on ontologies, OWL and Protege, that you have at Stanford, is it possible to watch them online? I believe that there are a lot of us who would love to attend but can't afford the travel costs (I am staying in Greece). I think a payed webinar or even better an online course (in Coursera for instance) could be a good alternative.

Best regards and really looking forward to your answer,
Vayianos


On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 2:51 AM, Tania Tudorache <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Casey,

You may want to check the existing multimedia vocabularies that have already been developed to see if you can reuse them. I know that a lot of effort has gone into them:

http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/mmsem/XGR-vocabularies/


If you need to import some external schemes into an ontology, it is very likely that no automatic import will create the intended semantic meaning. You may want to start from scratch (maybe reuse terms from existing vocabularies) with a clean conceptual model.

I would also suggest to use WebProtege (http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege) for creating the ontology rather than Protege desktop, as it has a much more user-friendly and easier-to-understand interface. WebProtege was created specially for users who are not ontology experts.

We will be offering at Stanford a 3-day course on ontologies, OWL and Protege in March 2015. We will publish the details shortly on the website. If you or anyone in the group is interested in atending, please contact me.

Best regards,
Tania

--
Tania Tudorache
Senior Research Scientist
Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
1265 Welch Rd.
Stanford, CA-94305
[hidden email]
http://www.stanford.edu/~ttania



On 11/12/2014 12:38 PM, Casey Davis wrote:
Greetings!

I'm emailing you on behalf of the Association of Moving Image Archivists PBCore Advisory Subcommittee to gather feedback and suggestions on ontology development. PBCore was developed about 10 years ago by public broadcasters as an XML schema for managing metadata about video and audio. Since then, the schema has been revised multiple times and adopted by a number of archives and archivists in the moving image archival community.

The PBCore Advisory Subcommittee is working on schema improvements,  developing an RDF ontology for PBCore, and outreach and education to users and potential users and improving the website.

We are making some minor bug fixes and updates to the XML schema, as well as refining and improving our controlled vocabularies. PBCore 2.1 (XML schema) will launch in March 2015. Why continue to maintain an XML schema, you ask? Some PBCore users (public media stations and archives) may continue to use PBCore XML until they have the resources and are capable of moving to an RDF model for storing and managing their data.

Our next goal is to develop an RDF ontology for PBCore. I recently read Natasha Noy and Deborah McGuinness' "Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology" paper and found it extremely helpful. We will also explore using Protégé to build and edit the ontology. 

I am wondering if any of you have any suggestions for us as we transform an XML schema (82 elements, 30 attributes, and some controlled vocabularies, including descriptive, intellectual property, and technical metadata) into an ontology. Do you know of any others who have done this? I will be looking at the work done by the BIBFRAME initiative at the LOC and EBUCore, an AV metadata ontology created by Europeana. 

If you have any suggestions or recommendations for us as we begin this work, please do share them. Thank you for your time!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting

WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation 

[hidden email] | <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="tel:617-300-5921" value="+16173005921" target="_blank">617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135 


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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

kcoyle
In reply to this post by Christian
While it may be convenient to convert from XSD to RDF or OWL, note that
it may not result in the best RDF. The document that you cite shows that
in moving from XSD to OWL you often end up with a vocabulary with many
blank nodes. This is because RDF/OWL is not hierarchical, but XSD is.
You should work to create a vocabulary that takes advantage of RDF's
capabilities, and for sure you will want to minimize the use of blank nodes.

kc

On 11/18/14 1:00 AM, Christian wrote:

> I'm currently working on a similar project, trying to translate XSD-Schema
> files to OWL2.
>
> I found the Rhizomik project (http://rhizomik.net/html/redefer/xsd2owl/)
> where they developed an methodology about how to map XSD to OWL2
> (http://rhizomik.net/html/~roberto/thesis/html/Methodology.html#XMLSemanticsReuse).
> They also developed a rudimentary XSLT script to do that job. Maybe thoose
> information can help you in translating the XSD schema into RDF.
>
> But actually, I had some problems using that XSLT script, especially if you
> have to deal with a bunch of XSD files that import/include each other,
> because thoose scripts only process a single time at once and therefore
> don't know what's defined in the other ones. It also seems to have some
> issues with namespaces. Therefore, I'm currently trying to develop a Java
> program that uses the OWL-API to translate my XSD-files all together,
> creating a new ontology for every used target namespace instead of a 1 to 1
> translation.
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://protege-project.136.n4.nabble.com/Advice-for-RDF-newbie-on-developing-an-ontology-tp4661744p4661764.html
> Sent from the Protege User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>

--
Karen Coyle
[hidden email] http://kcoyle.net
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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Casey Davis
Hi everyone,

Many thanks for everyone's suggestions about developing our RDF ontology
for PBCore. I'll probably have more questions in the coming months!

Our group is meeting in Portland, Oregon for a two day RDF ontology
hackathon on February 7-8, before the Code4Lib conference. We have a lot
of work to do before then (such as reviewing existing ontologies to see
what can be reused) but will be building the ontology on those two days.
If anyone on this list will be attending Code4Lib or lives in the area and
wants to participate in building an ontology for audiovisual materials,
let me know! We'd be happy to have others participate!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public
Broadcasting
WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation
[hidden email] | 617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135

Subscribe to the American Archive blog
<http://americanarchivepb.wordpress.com/>
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Re: Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Evain, Jean-Pierre
Hi Casey,

Would you like me to come and present EBUCore RDF?

If I remember well, I know several persons have been looking at it in your community too.

Best regards, jean-pierre

-----Original Message-----
From: protege-user [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Casey Davis
Sent: mercredi 26 novembre 2014 15:30
To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop
Subject: Re: [protege-user] Advice for RDF newbie on developing an ontology

Hi everyone,

Many thanks for everyone's suggestions about developing our RDF ontology for PBCore. I'll probably have more questions in the coming months!

Our group is meeting in Portland, Oregon for a two day RDF ontology hackathon on February 7-8, before the Code4Lib conference. We have a lot of work to do before then (such as reviewing existing ontologies to see what can be reused) but will be building the ontology on those two days.
If anyone on this list will be attending Code4Lib or lives in the area and wants to participate in building an ontology for audiovisual materials, let me know! We'd be happy to have others participate!

Best,
Casey

Casey E. Davis, MLIS | Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting WGBH Media Library and Archives | WGBH Educational Foundation [hidden email] | 617-300-5921 | One Guest Street | Boston, MA 02135

Subscribe to the American Archive blog
<http://americanarchivepb.wordpress.com/>
Follow the #AmericanArchive @amarchivepub



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