Export ontology as PDF

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Export ontology as PDF

Samah Alghamdi
Hello,
I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper? 
The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations. 

--
Regards,
Samah

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Martin Thomas Horsch
Dear colleagues,

this is of interest to me as well.

I am finalizing a paper where we include ontologies as supplementary
material. We were planning to simply attach the ontology TTL files. If
there is any recommended good practice on this, I would be glad to know.

Best regards,
Martin


On 18/07/2019 13:32, Samah Alghamdi wrote:

> Hello,
> I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any
> readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper?
> The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Michael DeBellis-2
I had the same issue a while ago, I wanted to include my ontology as an appendix to a paper but soon the ontology just got way too big and in any case with any non-trivial ontology just looking at a text file IMO is not the way to go. What I did was put the ontology on Web Protege and made it viewable by everyone and included a link to Web Protege in my paper with a short explanation that people had to create a Web Protege user ID (which is very easy, just give an email and create a password) to view it. That's what I would recommend. Also, if you do go that route I would recommend you first run the reasoner on your ontology then do "File>Export inferred axioms as ontology" and then upload that file to Web Protege so you get all the reasoner inferences. Note: there is a minor but in this option where you need to manually add the ".owl" extension to the saved file. 

Another option is to use WebVowl. It's a very snazzy looking ontology visualization tool. You can load your ontology into WebVowl and view it that way. You can also export a JSON file and create a link that automatically makes the JSON file viewable by anyone, even if they don't have the actual ontology. Essentially you create a link with the JSON file and another link embedded to load the JSON file into WebVowl. It sounds more complicated than it is, it's really simple, and then you have a link you can give people to view your ontology without requiring that they login to anything (just find a place to save your JSON file such as your personal or project web site). WebVowl is IMO one of those tools that looks really impressive when you start but it still needs some work to make it more usable and you have to experiment with it a lot to understand how to format the ontology to view what you want to view. 

However, if you still want to export as some sort of text file there are a couple of options. First, you can try Tools>Export Owl Doc That will generate HTML pages that correspond to your ontology. It essentially generates a web site that can be browsable and represents the objects in your ontology. Last time I tried it, the web site it generated wasn't very good but if you are good at HTML (which I'm not) you might be able to take that site and add some extra formatting to make it look decent. 

Or (and this is the best answer I know of to the original question) you can open your owl file in Notepad or some similar text editor, do a Print from the Text editor and then use the Print dialogue to save the file as a PDF rather than printing a hardcopy of the file. 

Of course if you are using one of the common formats like RDF/XML this will be verbose and hard for most people to understand. A better way would be to first do a Save As with the ontology and select one of the file formats that is more readable than RDF/XML. I think the Manchester OWL Syntax is probably the best. Although I notice there is also a LaTex format you can save in. I've never tried that  but that might also be more readable and good if unlike me you are well versed in editing LaTex documents. 

Michael



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:46 AM Martin Thomas Horsch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear colleagues,

this is of interest to me as well.

I am finalizing a paper where we include ontologies as supplementary
material. We were planning to simply attach the ontology TTL files. If
there is any recommended good practice on this, I would be glad to know.

Best regards,
Martin


On 18/07/2019 13:32, Samah Alghamdi wrote:
> Hello,
> I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any
> readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper?
> The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user

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[hidden email]
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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Samah Alghamdi
Thanks very much for the thorough answer 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 2:24 pm, Michael DeBellis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I had the same issue a while ago, I wanted to include my ontology as an appendix to a paper but soon the ontology just got way too big and in any case with any non-trivial ontology just looking at a text file IMO is not the way to go. What I did was put the ontology on Web Protege and made it viewable by everyone and included a link to Web Protege in my paper with a short explanation that people had to create a Web Protege user ID (which is very easy, just give an email and create a password) to view it. That's what I would recommend. Also, if you do go that route I would recommend you first run the reasoner on your ontology then do "File>Export inferred axioms as ontology" and then upload that file to Web Protege so you get all the reasoner inferences. Note: there is a minor but in this option where you need to manually add the ".owl" extension to the saved file. 

Another option is to use WebVowl. It's a very snazzy looking ontology visualization tool. You can load your ontology into WebVowl and view it that way. You can also export a JSON file and create a link that automatically makes the JSON file viewable by anyone, even if they don't have the actual ontology. Essentially you create a link with the JSON file and another link embedded to load the JSON file into WebVowl. It sounds more complicated than it is, it's really simple, and then you have a link you can give people to view your ontology without requiring that they login to anything (just find a place to save your JSON file such as your personal or project web site). WebVowl is IMO one of those tools that looks really impressive when you start but it still needs some work to make it more usable and you have to experiment with it a lot to understand how to format the ontology to view what you want to view. 

However, if you still want to export as some sort of text file there are a couple of options. First, you can try Tools>Export Owl Doc That will generate HTML pages that correspond to your ontology. It essentially generates a web site that can be browsable and represents the objects in your ontology. Last time I tried it, the web site it generated wasn't very good but if you are good at HTML (which I'm not) you might be able to take that site and add some extra formatting to make it look decent. 

Or (and this is the best answer I know of to the original question) you can open your owl file in Notepad or some similar text editor, do a Print from the Text editor and then use the Print dialogue to save the file as a PDF rather than printing a hardcopy of the file. 

Of course if you are using one of the common formats like RDF/XML this will be verbose and hard for most people to understand. A better way would be to first do a Save As with the ontology and select one of the file formats that is more readable than RDF/XML. I think the Manchester OWL Syntax is probably the best. Although I notice there is also a LaTex format you can save in. I've never tried that  but that might also be more readable and good if unlike me you are well versed in editing LaTex documents. 

Michael



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:46 AM Martin Thomas Horsch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear colleagues,

this is of interest to me as well.

I am finalizing a paper where we include ontologies as supplementary
material. We were planning to simply attach the ontology TTL files. If
there is any recommended good practice on this, I would be glad to know.

Best regards,
Martin


On 18/07/2019 13:32, Samah Alghamdi wrote:
> Hello,
> I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any
> readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper?
> The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
Regards,
Samah

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Jabardi
Hello,
You can open ontology using note bad , select all and copy to Microsoft word then save it as pdf
Regards

On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 6:54 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks very much for the thorough answer 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 2:24 pm, Michael DeBellis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I had the same issue a while ago, I wanted to include my ontology as an appendix to a paper but soon the ontology just got way too big and in any case with any non-trivial ontology just looking at a text file IMO is not the way to go. What I did was put the ontology on Web Protege and made it viewable by everyone and included a link to Web Protege in my paper with a short explanation that people had to create a Web Protege user ID (which is very easy, just give an email and create a password) to view it. That's what I would recommend. Also, if you do go that route I would recommend you first run the reasoner on your ontology then do "File>Export inferred axioms as ontology" and then upload that file to Web Protege so you get all the reasoner inferences. Note: there is a minor but in this option where you need to manually add the ".owl" extension to the saved file. 

Another option is to use WebVowl. It's a very snazzy looking ontology visualization tool. You can load your ontology into WebVowl and view it that way. You can also export a JSON file and create a link that automatically makes the JSON file viewable by anyone, even if they don't have the actual ontology. Essentially you create a link with the JSON file and another link embedded to load the JSON file into WebVowl. It sounds more complicated than it is, it's really simple, and then you have a link you can give people to view your ontology without requiring that they login to anything (just find a place to save your JSON file such as your personal or project web site). WebVowl is IMO one of those tools that looks really impressive when you start but it still needs some work to make it more usable and you have to experiment with it a lot to understand how to format the ontology to view what you want to view. 

However, if you still want to export as some sort of text file there are a couple of options. First, you can try Tools>Export Owl Doc That will generate HTML pages that correspond to your ontology. It essentially generates a web site that can be browsable and represents the objects in your ontology. Last time I tried it, the web site it generated wasn't very good but if you are good at HTML (which I'm not) you might be able to take that site and add some extra formatting to make it look decent. 

Or (and this is the best answer I know of to the original question) you can open your owl file in Notepad or some similar text editor, do a Print from the Text editor and then use the Print dialogue to save the file as a PDF rather than printing a hardcopy of the file. 

Of course if you are using one of the common formats like RDF/XML this will be verbose and hard for most people to understand. A better way would be to first do a Save As with the ontology and select one of the file formats that is more readable than RDF/XML. I think the Manchester OWL Syntax is probably the best. Although I notice there is also a LaTex format you can save in. I've never tried that  but that might also be more readable and good if unlike me you are well versed in editing LaTex documents. 

Michael



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:46 AM Martin Thomas Horsch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear colleagues,

this is of interest to me as well.

I am finalizing a paper where we include ontologies as supplementary
material. We were planning to simply attach the ontology TTL files. If
there is any recommended good practice on this, I would be glad to know.

Best regards,
Martin


On 18/07/2019 13:32, Samah Alghamdi wrote:
> Hello,
> I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any
> readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper?
> The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
Regards,
Samah
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
     Mohammed H Naji
Information Technology Research
                    and
 Development Center (ITRDC)
        Kufa University
07828776588 , 07723493472

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Samah Alghamdi
Thank you for responding 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 8:44 pm, Mohammed Jabardi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,
You can open ontology using note bad , select all and copy to Microsoft word then save it as pdf
Regards

On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 6:54 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks very much for the thorough answer 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 2:24 pm, Michael DeBellis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I had the same issue a while ago, I wanted to include my ontology as an appendix to a paper but soon the ontology just got way too big and in any case with any non-trivial ontology just looking at a text file IMO is not the way to go. What I did was put the ontology on Web Protege and made it viewable by everyone and included a link to Web Protege in my paper with a short explanation that people had to create a Web Protege user ID (which is very easy, just give an email and create a password) to view it. That's what I would recommend. Also, if you do go that route I would recommend you first run the reasoner on your ontology then do "File>Export inferred axioms as ontology" and then upload that file to Web Protege so you get all the reasoner inferences. Note: there is a minor but in this option where you need to manually add the ".owl" extension to the saved file. 

Another option is to use WebVowl. It's a very snazzy looking ontology visualization tool. You can load your ontology into WebVowl and view it that way. You can also export a JSON file and create a link that automatically makes the JSON file viewable by anyone, even if they don't have the actual ontology. Essentially you create a link with the JSON file and another link embedded to load the JSON file into WebVowl. It sounds more complicated than it is, it's really simple, and then you have a link you can give people to view your ontology without requiring that they login to anything (just find a place to save your JSON file such as your personal or project web site). WebVowl is IMO one of those tools that looks really impressive when you start but it still needs some work to make it more usable and you have to experiment with it a lot to understand how to format the ontology to view what you want to view. 

However, if you still want to export as some sort of text file there are a couple of options. First, you can try Tools>Export Owl Doc That will generate HTML pages that correspond to your ontology. It essentially generates a web site that can be browsable and represents the objects in your ontology. Last time I tried it, the web site it generated wasn't very good but if you are good at HTML (which I'm not) you might be able to take that site and add some extra formatting to make it look decent. 

Or (and this is the best answer I know of to the original question) you can open your owl file in Notepad or some similar text editor, do a Print from the Text editor and then use the Print dialogue to save the file as a PDF rather than printing a hardcopy of the file. 

Of course if you are using one of the common formats like RDF/XML this will be verbose and hard for most people to understand. A better way would be to first do a Save As with the ontology and select one of the file formats that is more readable than RDF/XML. I think the Manchester OWL Syntax is probably the best. Although I notice there is also a LaTex format you can save in. I've never tried that  but that might also be more readable and good if unlike me you are well versed in editing LaTex documents. 

Michael



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:46 AM Martin Thomas Horsch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear colleagues,

this is of interest to me as well.

I am finalizing a paper where we include ontologies as supplementary
material. We were planning to simply attach the ontology TTL files. If
there is any recommended good practice on this, I would be glad to know.

Best regards,
Martin


On 18/07/2019 13:32, Samah Alghamdi wrote:
> Hello,
> I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any
> readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper?
> The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
Regards,
Samah
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
     Mohammed H Naji
Information Technology Research
                    and
 Development Center (ITRDC)
        Kufa University
07828776588 , 07723493472
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
Regards,
Samah

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Mike Bergman

Hi,

Anything you can get into a word processor, including Word and LibreOffice, including HTML, will allow you to generate a PDF.

In years past, we used OWLDoc [1], but it has not been updated to the latest Protégé. You can still download earlier Protégé versions and run the plugin. I suspect this might be your strongest option.

WIDOCO [2] (see its gallery [3]) gives you some more flexible display options. There is an OWL-Coat option still in alpha [4] that may have some longer-term promise. Ontodocs/OntoSpy is a Python option [5] with a lot of template flexibility; see the gallery [6]. Wandora can conceivably be massaged for display/publication purposes [7]. OnToology
 [8], pyLODE [9], Parrot [10] and the older specgen [11] are specification generators that may be of some use.

Mike

[1] https://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/OWLDoc
[2] https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco
[3] http://dgarijo.github.io/Widoco/doc/gallery/
[4] https://github.com/DOREMUS-ANR/OWL-Coat
[5] https://pypi.org/project/ontodocs/
[6] http://www.michelepasin.org/support/ontospy-examples/instructionalobjectsxml/index.html
[7] http://wandora.org/www/
[8] https://github.com/OnToology/OnToology
[9] https://github.com/RDFLib/pyLODE
[10] https://github.com/dayures/parrot
[11] https://github.com/specgen/specgen


On 7/18/2019 10:34 PM, Samah Alghamdi wrote:
Thank you for responding 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 8:44 pm, Mohammed Jabardi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,
You can open ontology using note bad , select all and copy to Microsoft word then save it as pdf
Regards

On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 6:54 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks very much for the thorough answer 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 2:24 pm, Michael DeBellis <[hidden email]> wrote:
I had the same issue a while ago, I wanted to include my ontology as an appendix to a paper but soon the ontology just got way too big and in any case with any non-trivial ontology just looking at a text file IMO is not the way to go. What I did was put the ontology on Web Protege and made it viewable by everyone and included a link to Web Protege in my paper with a short explanation that people had to create a Web Protege user ID (which is very easy, just give an email and create a password) to view it. That's what I would recommend. Also, if you do go that route I would recommend you first run the reasoner on your ontology then do "File>Export inferred axioms as ontology" and then upload that file to Web Protege so you get all the reasoner inferences. Note: there is a minor but in this option where you need to manually add the ".owl" extension to the saved file. 

Another option is to use WebVowl. It's a very snazzy looking ontology visualization tool. You can load your ontology into WebVowl and view it that way. You can also export a JSON file and create a link that automatically makes the JSON file viewable by anyone, even if they don't have the actual ontology. Essentially you create a link with the JSON file and another link embedded to load the JSON file into WebVowl. It sounds more complicated than it is, it's really simple, and then you have a link you can give people to view your ontology without requiring that they login to anything (just find a place to save your JSON file such as your personal or project web site). WebVowl is IMO one of those tools that looks really impressive when you start but it still needs some work to make it more usable and you have to experiment with it a lot to understand how to format the ontology to view what you want to view. 

However, if you still want to export as some sort of text file there are a couple of options. First, you can try Tools>Export Owl Doc That will generate HTML pages that correspond to your ontology. It essentially generates a web site that can be browsable and represents the objects in your ontology. Last time I tried it, the web site it generated wasn't very good but if you are good at HTML (which I'm not) you might be able to take that site and add some extra formatting to make it look decent. 

Or (and this is the best answer I know of to the original question) you can open your owl file in Notepad or some similar text editor, do a Print from the Text editor and then use the Print dialogue to save the file as a PDF rather than printing a hardcopy of the file. 

Of course if you are using one of the common formats like RDF/XML this will be verbose and hard for most people to understand. A better way would be to first do a Save As with the ontology and select one of the file formats that is more readable than RDF/XML. I think the Manchester OWL Syntax is probably the best. Although I notice there is also a LaTex format you can save in. I've never tried that  but that might also be more readable and good if unlike me you are well versed in editing LaTex documents. 

Michael



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:46 AM Martin Thomas Horsch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear colleagues,

this is of interest to me as well.

I am finalizing a paper where we include ontologies as supplementary
material. We were planning to simply attach the ontology TTL files. If
there is any recommended good practice on this, I would be glad to know.

Best regards,
Martin


On 18/07/2019 13:32, Samah Alghamdi wrote:
> Hello,
> I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any
> readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper?
> The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
Regards,
Samah
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
     Mohammed H Naji
Information Technology Research
                    and
 Development Center (ITRDC)
        Kufa University
07828776588 , 07723493472
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
--
Regards,
Samah

_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user

  


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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Martin Thomas Horsch
Dear Mike,

thanks for your advice. I used Widoco and am very satisfied with it.

Best wishes,

Martin


On 18/07/2019 22:55, Mike Bergman wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Anything you can get into a word processor, including Word and
> LibreOffice, including HTML, will allow you to generate a PDF.
>
> In years past, we used OWLDoc [1], but it has not been updated to the
> latest Protégé. You can still download earlier Protégé versions and run
> the plugin. I suspect this might be your strongest option.
>
> WIDOCO [2] (see its gallery [3]) gives you some more flexible display
> options. There is an OWL-Coat option still in alpha [4] that may have
> some longer-term promise. Ontodocs/OntoSpy is a Python option [5] with a
> lot of template flexibility; see the gallery [6]. Wandora can
> conceivably be massaged for display/publication purposes [7]. OnToology
>   [8], pyLODE [9], Parrot [10] and the older specgen [11] are
> specification generators that may be of some use.
>
> Mike
>
> [1] https://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/OWLDoc
> [2] https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco
> [3] http://dgarijo.github.io/Widoco/doc/gallery/
> [4] https://github.com/DOREMUS-ANR/OWL-Coat
> [5] https://pypi.org/project/ontodocs/
> [6]
> http://www.michelepasin.org/support/ontospy-examples/instructionalobjectsxml/index.html
> [7] http://wandora.org/www/
> [8] https://github.com/OnToology/OnToology
> [9] https://github.com/RDFLib/pyLODE
> [10] https://github.com/dayures/parrot
> [11] https://github.com/specgen/specgen

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Mike Bergman
;)

On 7/23/2019 4:09 PM, Martin Thomas Horsch wrote:

> Dear Mike,
>
> thanks for your advice. I used Widoco and am very satisfied with it.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Martin
>
>
> On 18/07/2019 22:55, Mike Bergman wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> Anything you can get into a word processor, including Word and
>> LibreOffice, including HTML, will allow you to generate a PDF.
>>
>> In years past, we used OWLDoc [1], but it has not been updated to the
>> latest Protégé. You can still download earlier Protégé versions and
>> run the plugin. I suspect this might be your strongest option.
>>
>> WIDOCO [2] (see its gallery [3]) gives you some more flexible display
>> options. There is an OWL-Coat option still in alpha [4] that may have
>> some longer-term promise. Ontodocs/OntoSpy is a Python option [5]
>> with a lot of template flexibility; see the gallery [6]. Wandora can
>> conceivably be massaged for display/publication purposes [7]. OnToology
>>   [8], pyLODE [9], Parrot [10] and the older specgen [11] are
>> specification generators that may be of some use.
>>
>> Mike
>>
>> [1] https://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/OWLDoc
>> [2] https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco
>> [3] http://dgarijo.github.io/Widoco/doc/gallery/
>> [4] https://github.com/DOREMUS-ANR/OWL-Coat
>> [5] https://pypi.org/project/ontodocs/
>> [6]
>> http://www.michelepasin.org/support/ontospy-examples/instructionalobjectsxml/index.html
>> [7] http://wandora.org/www/
>> [8] https://github.com/OnToology/OnToology
>> [9] https://github.com/RDFLib/pyLODE
>> [10] https://github.com/dayures/parrot
>> [11] https://github.com/specgen/specgen
>
>
>
--
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Michael K. Bergman
Cognonto Corporation
319.621.5225
skype:michaelkbergman
http://cognonto.com
http://mkbergman.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/mkbergman
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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Biswanath Dutta
In reply to this post by Samah Alghamdi


You may use Widoco (https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco). See here an example that I have generated using Widoco (https://www.isibang.ac.in/ns/mod/index.html). 

Regards,
Biswanath 



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 5:02 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,
I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper? 
The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations. 

--
Regards,
Samah
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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Samah Alghamdi
Hi,
It looks perfect. Have you done any sort of customization to show the document in tidy manner? 

On Wed, 24 Jul 2019 at 9:35 am, Biswanath Dutta <[hidden email]> wrote:


You may use Widoco (https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco). See here an example that I have generated using Widoco (https://www.isibang.ac.in/ns/mod/index.html). 

Regards,
Biswanath 



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 5:02 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,
I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper? 
The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations. 

--
Regards,
Samah
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Regards,
Samah

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Biswanath Dutta


It looks perfect. Have you done any sort of customization to show the document in tidy manner? 

Not really, except the figure on the page (showing the overview of the Ontology classes and properties). 
Note that the Widoco software also has a facility to automatically generate a similar figure but for some reason, it was coming well. 

Regards,
Biswanath 


 

On Wed, 24 Jul 2019 at 9:35 am, Biswanath Dutta <[hidden email]> wrote:


You may use Widoco (https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco). See here an example that I have generated using Widoco (https://www.isibang.ac.in/ns/mod/index.html). 

Regards,
Biswanath 



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 5:02 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,
I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper? 
The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations. 

--
Regards,
Samah
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--
Regards,
Samah
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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Samah Alghamdi
Much appreciated

On Wed, 24 Jul 2019 at 1:25 pm, Biswanath Dutta <[hidden email]> wrote:


It looks perfect. Have you done any sort of customization to show the document in tidy manner? 

Not really, except the figure on the page (showing the overview of the Ontology classes and properties). 
Note that the Widoco software also has a facility to automatically generate a similar figure but for some reason, it was coming well. 

Regards,
Biswanath 


 

On Wed, 24 Jul 2019 at 9:35 am, Biswanath Dutta <[hidden email]> wrote:


You may use Widoco (https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco). See here an example that I have generated using Widoco (https://www.isibang.ac.in/ns/mod/index.html). 

Regards,
Biswanath 



On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 5:02 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello,
I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper? 
The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations. 

--
Regards,
Samah
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--
Regards,
Samah
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Samah

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Re: Export ontology as PDF

Nicholas Car

Hi all,

 

Just picking up on this thread.

 

I’ve been working on an ontology documentation tool pyLODE that picks up from LODE and is in the Python rdflib family of tools: https://github.com/rdflib/pyLODE/

 

pyLODE’s under active development now since the Australian government and a few other places are using it quite a bit.

 

See the Issues list: https://github.com/RDFLib/pyLODE/issues. There’s already an issue to handle MOD ontology annotations (https://github.com/RDFLib/pyLODE/issues/1) and I’ve just added one to export to PDF (https://github.com/RDFLib/pyLODE/issues/26).

 

Also note that current development’s focussing on delivering an online version of the tool, just as LODE used to have. Already we have an online API (https://kurrawong.net/pylode-online) and soon we’ll have the wen UI to access it up.

 

Very happy to have requests or collaboration!

 

Cheers,

 

Nick

 

 

From: protege-user <[hidden email]> on behalf of Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]>
Reply to: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop <[hidden email]>
Date: Wednesday, 24 July 2019 at 10:31 pm
To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [protege-user] Export ontology as PDF

 

Much appreciated

 

On Wed, 24 Jul 2019 at 1:25 pm, Biswanath Dutta <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

It looks perfect. Have you done any sort of customization to show the document in tidy manner? 

 

Not really, except the figure on the page (showing the overview of the Ontology classes and properties). 

Note that the Widoco software also has a facility to automatically generate a similar figure but for some reason, it was coming well. 

 

Regards,

Biswanath 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, 24 Jul 2019 at 9:35 am, Biswanath Dutta <[hidden email]> wrote:

 

 

You may use Widoco (https://github.com/dgarijo/Widoco). See here an example that I have generated using Widoco (https://www.isibang.ac.in/ns/mod/index.html). 

 

Regards,

Biswanath 

 

 

 

On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 5:02 PM Samah Alghamdi <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hello,

I’d like to know if there is a way to export an ontology as PDF or any readable format to include it as appendix in a research paper? 

The goal is to show all classes, properties and annotations. 

 

--

Regards,
Samah

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Samah

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