Is there a limit to size of ontology?

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
10 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Is there a limit to size of ontology?

arathi-2

Hi,

 

We are in the process of developing an ontology with 8 classes out of which two classes will have around 3000 and 15000 subclasses. When we try to activate FACT++ or Pellet or HermiT  reasoner to enable a DL query, the tool crashes. Also saving is slowing down as more data in updated. Is there a critical size for an ontology beyond which Protégé fails to support? We are using Protege4.3.

 

Thank you,

 

Best Regards,

Arathi

 


----
DISCLAIMER: This e-mail is confidential and should not be used by anyone who is not the original intended recipient. If you have received this e-mail in error please inform the sender and delete it from your mailbox or any other storage mechanism. Neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd. nor any of its agents accept liability for any statements made which are clearly the sender's own and not expressly made on behalf of Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd or one of its agents. Please note that neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd nor any of its agents accept any responsibility for viruses that may be contained in this e-mail or its attachments and it is your responsibility to scan the e-mail and attachments (if any). No contracts may be concluded on behalf of Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd or its agents by means of e-mail communication.
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

David Whitten
Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?
Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and not put much detail in?

There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9 years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?

in Awe,
David Whitten
713-870-3834


On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:28 AM, arathi <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi,

 

We are in the process of developing an ontology with 8 classes out of which two classes will have around 3000 and 15000 subclasses. When we try to activate FACT++ or Pellet or HermiT  reasoner to enable a DL query, the tool crashes. Also saving is slowing down as more data in updated. Is there a critical size for an ontology beyond which Protégé fails to support? We are using Protege4.3.

 

Thank you,

 

Best Regards,

Arathi

 


----
DISCLAIMER: This e-mail is confidential and should not be used by anyone who is not the original intended recipient. If you have received this e-mail in error please inform the sender and delete it from your mailbox or any other storage mechanism. Neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd. nor any of its agents accept liability for any statements made which are clearly the sender's own and not expressly made on behalf of Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd or one of its agents. Please note that neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd nor any of its agents accept any responsibility for viruses that may be contained in this e-mail or its attachments and it is your responsibility to scan the e-mail and attachments (if any). No contracts may be concluded on behalf of Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd or its agents by means of e-mail communication.

_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user



_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

Steve Wartik

This isn’t as uncommon as you might think. Derive an ontology from a longstanding standard (that is, someone else did the work) containing an enumerated list and you can easily have that many subclasses – one for each value in the list. I’ve seen it many times.

 

From: protege-user [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of David Whitten
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 9:38 AM
To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop
Subject: Re: [protege-user] Is there a limit to size of ontology?

 

Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?

Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and not put much detail in?

There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9 years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?

in Awe,
David Whitten
713-870-3834

 


_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

David Whitten
Thanks for your reminder, Steve. I can see how loading a previously developed Standard
can allow you to generate such an ontology.So the need for Protege to support these kind of long standing ontologies is definitely there.

But an ontology is a LOT more than a list of words.  With a List of words, you can conclude
that a particular word is in the list, but what kind of reasoning can you do?
You can't even guarantee what the meaning of the word in the list is. 
(c.f. river bank vs financial bank)

An ontology is a lot more than a vocabulary or even a taxonomy.
As was so ably explained at

Even determining common properties across all 18,000 entries and making sure they are appropriately setup takes time and energy.  But without the work, your ontology can't be properly interoperable with
other ontologies, and can't be curated, etc.

David Whitten


On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:41 AM, Wartik, Steven P "Steve" <[hidden email]> wrote:

This isn’t as uncommon as you might think. Derive an ontology from a longstanding standard (that is, someone else did the work) containing an enumerated list and you can easily have that many subclasses – one for each value in the list. I’ve seen it many times.

 

From: protege-user [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of David Whitten
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 9:38 AM
To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop
Subject: Re: [protege-user] Is there a limit to size of ontology?

 

Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?

Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and not put much detail in?

There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9 years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?

in Awe,
David Whitten
<a href="tel:713-870-3834" value="+17138703834" target="_blank">713-870-3834

 


_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user



_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

Steve Wartik

David,

 

You’re quite right, of course. I didn’t mean to suggest otherwise. It’s just that in my world, people often claim victory when they have expressed concepts as OWL classes, properties and restrictions be damned. My perspective gets warped.

 

Regards,

 

Steve Wartik

 

From: protege-user [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of David Whitten
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 10:06 AM
To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop
Subject: Re: [protege-user] Is there a limit to size of ontology?

 

Thanks for your reminder, Steve. I can see how loading a previously developed Standard

can allow you to generate such an ontology.So the need for Protege to support these kind of long standing ontologies is definitely there.

 

But an ontology is a LOT more than a list of words.  With a List of words, you can conclude

that a particular word is in the list, but what kind of reasoning can you do?

You can't even guarantee what the meaning of the word in the list is. 

(c.f. river bank vs financial bank)

 

An ontology is a lot more than a vocabulary or even a taxonomy.

As was so ably explained at

 

Even determining common properties across all 18,000 entries and making sure they are appropriately setup takes time and energy.  But without the work, your ontology can't be properly interoperable with

other ontologies, and can't be curated, etc.

 

David Whitten

 

On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:41 AM, Wartik, Steven P "Steve" <[hidden email]> wrote:

This isn’t as uncommon as you might think. Derive an ontology from a longstanding standard (that is, someone else did the work) containing an enumerated list and you can easily have that many subclasses – one for each value in the list. I’ve seen it many times.

 

From: protege-user [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of David Whitten
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 9:38 AM
To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop
Subject: Re: [protege-user] Is there a limit to size of ontology?

 

Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?

Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and not put much detail in?

There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9 years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?

in Awe,
David Whitten
<a href="tel:713-870-3834" target="_blank">713-870-3834

 


_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user

 


_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

Pavel Klinov
In reply to this post by David Whitten
There are many, many ontologies considerably larger than 18K concepts.
SNOMED CT has around 300,000 classes, iirc. It's not very complex but
not a trivial taxonomy either.

Cheers,
Pavel

On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 4:06 PM, David Whitten <[hidden email]> wrote:
[snip]

>
> An ontology is a lot more than a vocabulary or even a taxonomy.
> As was so ably explained at
> http://info.5amsolutions.com/blog/bid/154967/6-Points-Along-the-Ontology-Spectrum
>
> Even determining common properties across all 18,000 entries and making sure
> they are appropriately setup takes time and energy.  But without the work,
> your ontology can't be properly interoperable with
> other ontologies, and can't be curated, etc.
>
> David Whitten
>
>
> On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:41 AM, Wartik, Steven P "Steve" <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> This isn’t as uncommon as you might think. Derive an ontology from a
>> longstanding standard (that is, someone else did the work) containing an
>> enumerated list and you can easily have that many subclasses – one for each
>> value in the list. I’ve seen it many times.
>>
>>
>>
>> From: protege-user [mailto:[hidden email]] On
>> Behalf Of David Whitten
>> Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 9:38 AM
>> To: User support for WebProtege and Protege Desktop
>> Subject: Re: [protege-user] Is there a limit to size of ontology?
>>
>>
>>
>> Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?
>>
>> Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and
>> not put much detail in?
>>
>> There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over
>> 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9
>> years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?
>>
>> in Awe,
>> David Whitten
>> 713-870-3834
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> protege-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

Phillip Lord
In reply to this post by David Whitten

We have 1,500 (which is 10x less, I realise so not that impressive) in
our karyotype ontology. Most of them are generated from a couple of
patterns, though, so we generate the whole thing programmatically.
We describe our karyotype and pattern work here...

http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.3758
http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.0465

There's a nice paper from some friends at Manchester ---

https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:217528

They talked to quite a few ontology builders, and found that quite a few
build sections of their ontology programmatically.

Phil

David Whitten <[hidden email]> writes:

> Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?
> Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and
> not put much detail in?
>
> There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over
> 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9
> years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?
>
> in Awe,
> David Whitten
> 713-870-3834
>
>
> On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:28 AM, arathi <[hidden email]>wrote:
>
>>  Hi,
>>
>>
>>
>> We are in the process of developing an ontology with 8 classes out of
>> which two classes will have around 3000 and 15000 subclasses. When we try
>> to activate FACT++ or Pellet or HermiT  reasoner to enable a DL query, the
>> tool crashes. Also saving is slowing down as more data in updated. Is there
>> a critical size for an ontology beyond which Protégé fails to support? We
>> are using Protege4.3.
>>
>>
>>
>> Thank you,
>>
>>
>>
>> Best Regards,
>>
>> Arathi
>>
>>
>>
>> ----
>> DISCLAIMER: This e-mail is confidential and should not be used by anyone
>> who is not the original intended recipient. If you have received this
>> e-mail in error please inform the sender and delete it from your mailbox or
>> any other storage mechanism. Neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd. nor
>> any of its agents accept liability for any statements made which are
>> clearly the sender's own and not expressly made on behalf of Molecular
>> Connections Pvt. Ltd or one of its agents. Please note that neither
>> Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd nor any of its agents accept any
>> responsibility for viruses that may be contained in this e-mail or its
>> attachments and it is your responsibility to scan the e-mail and
>> attachments (if any). No contracts may be concluded on behalf of Molecular
>> Connections Pvt. Ltd or its agents by means of e-mail communication.
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> protege-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>>
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user

--
Phillip Lord,                           Phone: +44 (0) 191 222 7827
Lecturer in Bioinformatics,             Email: [hidden email]
School of Computing Science,            http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/phillip.lord
Room 914 Claremont Tower,               skype: russet_apples
Newcastle University,                   twitter: phillord
NE1 7RU                                
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

David Whitten
If you can generate the properties of entries programmatically, then what is the advantage (other than memoizing or caching) that you get from actually storing the data with the entries?

It seems that a "computed" property would do all you need, and you would still be able to refer to the element and its properties without having to store it in OWL or any kind of data store.
As a dilettante in Protege, I don't recall if this kind of computed property exists already,
nor if you can specify it in transfer forms such as OWL or Common Logic


On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 11:25 AM, Phillip Lord <[hidden email]> wrote:

We have 1,500 (which is 10x less, I realise so not that impressive) in
our karyotype ontology. Most of them are generated from a couple of
patterns, though, so we generate the whole thing programmatically.
We describe our karyotype and pattern work here...

http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.3758
http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.0465

There's a nice paper from some friends at Manchester ---

https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:217528

They talked to quite a few ontology builders, and found that quite a few
build sections of their ontology programmatically.

Phil

David Whitten <[hidden email]> writes:

> Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?
> Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and
> not put much detail in?
>
> There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's over
> 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's over 9
> years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?
>
> in Awe,
> David Whitten
> <a href="tel:713-870-3834" value="+17138703834">713-870-3834
>
>
> On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:28 AM, arathi <[hidden email]>wrote:
>
>>  Hi,
>>
>>
>>
>> We are in the process of developing an ontology with 8 classes out of
>> which two classes will have around 3000 and 15000 subclasses. When we try
>> to activate FACT++ or Pellet or HermiT  reasoner to enable a DL query, the
>> tool crashes. Also saving is slowing down as more data in updated. Is there
>> a critical size for an ontology beyond which Protégé fails to support? We
>> are using Protege4.3.
>>
>>
>>
>> Thank you,
>>
>>
>>
>> Best Regards,
>>
>> Arathi
>>
>>
>>
>> ----
>> DISCLAIMER: This e-mail is confidential and should not be used by anyone
>> who is not the original intended recipient. If you have received this
>> e-mail in error please inform the sender and delete it from your mailbox or
>> any other storage mechanism. Neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd. nor
>> any of its agents accept liability for any statements made which are
>> clearly the sender's own and not expressly made on behalf of Molecular
>> Connections Pvt. Ltd or one of its agents. Please note that neither
>> Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd nor any of its agents accept any
>> responsibility for viruses that may be contained in this e-mail or its
>> attachments and it is your responsibility to scan the e-mail and
>> attachments (if any). No contracts may be concluded on behalf of Molecular
>> Connections Pvt. Ltd or its agents by means of e-mail communication.
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> protege-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>>
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> protege-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user

--
Phillip Lord,                           Phone: <a href="tel:%2B44%20%280%29%20191%20222%207827" value="+441912227827">+44 (0) 191 222 7827
Lecturer in Bioinformatics,             Email: [hidden email]
School of Computing Science,            http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/phillip.lord
Room 914 Claremont Tower,               skype: russet_apples
Newcastle University,                   twitter: phillord
NE1 7RU


_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

samsontu
In reply to this post by arathi-2
Try to allocate more memory to the Protege Java process, either by editing the lax file or by using the-Xmx command line argument. You may be running into out-of-memroy situation.

With best regards,
Samson



On May 23, 2014, at 6:28 AM, arathi <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi,
 
We are in the process of developing an ontology with 8 classes out of which two classes will have around 3000 and 15000 subclasses. When we try to activate FACT++ or Pellet or HermiT  reasoner to enable a DL query, the tool crashes. Also saving is slowing down as more data in updated. Is there a critical size for an ontology beyond which Protégé fails to support? We are using Protege4.3.
 
Thank you,
 
Best Regards,
Arathi
 

---- 
DISCLAIMER: This e-mail is confidential and should not be used by anyone who is not the original intended recipient. If you have received this e-mail in error please inform the sender and delete it from your mailbox or any other storage mechanism. Neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd. nor any of its agents accept liability for any statements made which are clearly the sender's own and not expressly made on behalf of Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd or one of its agents. Please note that neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd nor any of its agents accept any responsibility for viruses that may be contained in this e-mail or its attachments and it is your responsibility to scan the e-mail and attachments (if any). No contracts may be concluded on behalf of Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd or its agents by means of e-mail communication._______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user


_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Is there a limit to size of ontology?

Phillip Lord
In reply to this post by Phillip Lord

Well, a programming language is richer than OWL (for which you pay the
price of decidability). So, for example, I can express things
programmatically that I cannot express in OWL, such as "The calorific
value of a pizza is the sum of calorific value of it's ingredients".

Actually, I can't quite do that programmatically either, as OWL is open
world. I can say it for the pizza's I know about though.

In the case of the karyotype ontology, the purpose is simpler. We have
some data that we know about, and we want to represent this ontological,
where the OWL structure is relatively complex, and where we want to
abstract over the exact axiomatisation. This form of templating is very
common. The ICD11 version of webprotege does the same thing, I believe.
The Gene Ontology uses it also. The difference with the karyotype
ontology is that we store the source, and do the expansion regularly,
which allows us to change the axiomatisation.

Phil


David Whitten <[hidden email]> writes:

> If you can generate the properties of entries programmatically, then what
> is the advantage (other than memoizing or caching) that you get from
> actually storing the data with the entries?
>
> It seems that a "computed" property would do all you need, and you would
> still be able to refer to the element and its properties without having to
> store it in OWL or any kind of data store.
> As a dilettante in Protege, I don't recall if this kind of computed
> property exists already,
> nor if you can specify it in transfer forms such as OWL or Common Logic
>
> David Whitten
> 713-870-3834
>
>
> On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 11:25 AM, Phillip Lord <[hidden email]
>> wrote:
>
>>
>> We have 1,500 (which is 10x less, I realise so not that impressive) in
>> our karyotype ontology. Most of them are generated from a couple of
>> patterns, though, so we generate the whole thing programmatically.
>> We describe our karyotype and pattern work here...
>>
>> http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.3758
>> http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.0465
>>
>> There's a nice paper from some friends at Manchester ---
>>
>> https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/uk-ac-man-scw:217528
>>
>> They talked to quite a few ontology builders, and found that quite a few
>> build sections of their ontology programmatically.
>>
>> Phil
>>
>> David Whitten <[hidden email]> writes:
>>
>> > Just for curiosity, how do you manage 15000 subclasses?
>> > Do you have a huge staff or do you just put the name in the ontology and
>> > not put much detail in?
>> >
>> > There are only about 2000 work hours in a year for one person. That's
>> over
>> > 7.5 years worth of work.  (or for the whole 18000 subclasses, that's
>> over 9
>> > years of work) How do you find the time and energy to accomplish this?
>> >
>> > in Awe,
>> > David Whitten
>> > 713-870-3834
>> >
>> >
>> > On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 9:28 AM, arathi <[hidden email]
>> >wrote:
>> >
>> >>  Hi,
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> We are in the process of developing an ontology with 8 classes out of
>> >> which two classes will have around 3000 and 15000 subclasses. When we
>> try
>> >> to activate FACT++ or Pellet or HermiT  reasoner to enable a DL query,
>> the
>> >> tool crashes. Also saving is slowing down as more data in updated. Is
>> there
>> >> a critical size for an ontology beyond which Protégé fails to support?
>> We
>> >> are using Protege4.3.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> Thank you,
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> Best Regards,
>> >>
>> >> Arathi
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> ----
>> >> DISCLAIMER: This e-mail is confidential and should not be used by anyone
>> >> who is not the original intended recipient. If you have received this
>> >> e-mail in error please inform the sender and delete it from your
>> mailbox or
>> >> any other storage mechanism. Neither Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd. nor
>> >> any of its agents accept liability for any statements made which are
>> >> clearly the sender's own and not expressly made on behalf of Molecular
>> >> Connections Pvt. Ltd or one of its agents. Please note that neither
>> >> Molecular Connections Pvt. Ltd nor any of its agents accept any
>> >> responsibility for viruses that may be contained in this e-mail or its
>> >> attachments and it is your responsibility to scan the e-mail and
>> >> attachments (if any). No contracts may be concluded on behalf of
>> Molecular
>> >> Connections Pvt. Ltd or its agents by means of e-mail communication.
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> protege-user mailing list
>> >> [hidden email]
>> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > protege-user mailing list
>> > [hidden email]
>> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user
>>
>> --
>> Phillip Lord,                           Phone: +44 (0) 191 222 7827
>> Lecturer in Bioinformatics,             Email:
>> [hidden email]
>> School of Computing Science,
>> http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/phillip.lord
>> Room 914 Claremont Tower,               skype: russet_apples
>> Newcastle University,                   twitter: phillord
>> NE1 7RU
>>

--
Phillip Lord,                           Phone: +44 (0) 191 222 7827
Lecturer in Bioinformatics,             Email: [hidden email]
School of Computing Science,            http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/phillip.lord
Room 914 Claremont Tower,               skype: russet_apples
Newcastle University,                   twitter: phillord
NE1 7RU                                
_______________________________________________
protege-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/protege-user