Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

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Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

Michael DeBellis-2
This isn't exactly a Protege question (although we are using Protege) but I thought this would be one of the best places to ask this question. I'm working with someone who wants to use an ontology to provide a Semantic Search tool for academic papers and other media (videos, audio lectures, etc.). We are focusing on a few specific authors and disciplines right now: Politics, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy but I think even with the media we already have they span so many overlapping disciplines (e.g., much of the Cognitive Science work has references to Biology and Anthropology) and there will be connections to other people and media at some point we are going to want to model almost all domains within the sciences (soft and hard) as well as Political Science and Philosophy. So I have 4 questions:

1) Are there any good tools to take a corpus of media (documents, videos, audio of lectures, etc.) and automatically match them against an OWL ontology? There is a commercial tool called Pool Party that seems to do this really well but it's too expensive for our requirements. The ideal would be a free open source tool but we could spend a bit on a license if it wasn't too expensive.Also, much of the starting corpus is already tagged with XML, just not OWL so if there are tools that can work with mapping XML to OWL that would be useful. 

2) Are there any good existing vocabularies that cover the space of scientific disciplines and/or authors and/or theories, concepts, etc.?

3) Does anyone have an opinion for how to model such a broad space? At first I was thinking create a few modular ontologies but the more I think of it the more I think there are going to be so many interconnections using one large ontology might be the way to go. Also, we've been looking at some impressive triple store products, that fit with our budget so I think one large ontology could scale up. 

4) Are there any existing tools that can take an ontology and do natural language or graphical type searching and browsing? I've seen a few things on the DBpedia research page that seem interesting and would be interested in pointers to other tools. It seems like a natural application of the technology and I don't want to re-invent the wheel. 

Any and all ideas would be appreciated. Feel free to contact me directly if you don't think this would be of interest to the whole list. 

Cheers,
Michael

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Re: Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

smrUSGIN

As far as indexing you might take a look at https://github.com/iodepo/OceanBestPractices, they’re doing something like that with AWS components.

Steve

 

Stephen M. Richard

US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN)

[hidden email]

520-869-8545

 

 

 

 


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Re: Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

Michael DeBellis-2
Thanks Steve.

On Tue, Feb 18, 2020 at 9:46 AM AZ Stephen Richard <[hidden email]> wrote:

As far as indexing you might take a look at https://github.com/iodepo/OceanBestPractices, they’re doing something like that with AWS components.

Steve

 

Stephen M. Richard

US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN)

[hidden email]

520-869-8545

 

 

 

 

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Re: Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

Lorenz Buehmann
In reply to this post by Michael DeBellis-2

Hi Michael,

not sure if this is what you're interested in, but a former colleague of mine, Prof. Sören Auer is doing a large project dubbed "Open Research Knowledge Graph" that might be related to your question, at TIB Hannover, Germany [1]. Maybe you can find some good resources there or even get in touch with those people.

Also, Dr. Sahar Vahdati [2] was working on Open Semantic Scholarly Data and there is an ongoing H2020 project called OpenAIRE [3].


Maybe useless pointers for you, but who knows.


[1] https://projects.tib.eu/orkg/
[2] http://sda.cs.uni-bonn.de/people/sahar-vahdati/
[3] https://www.openaire.eu/

On 18.02.20 18:29, Michael DeBellis wrote:
This isn't exactly a Protege question (although we are using Protege) but I thought this would be one of the best places to ask this question. I'm working with someone who wants to use an ontology to provide a Semantic Search tool for academic papers and other media (videos, audio lectures, etc.). We are focusing on a few specific authors and disciplines right now: Politics, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy but I think even with the media we already have they span so many overlapping disciplines (e.g., much of the Cognitive Science work has references to Biology and Anthropology) and there will be connections to other people and media at some point we are going to want to model almost all domains within the sciences (soft and hard) as well as Political Science and Philosophy. So I have 4 questions:

1) Are there any good tools to take a corpus of media (documents, videos, audio of lectures, etc.) and automatically match them against an OWL ontology? There is a commercial tool called Pool Party that seems to do this really well but it's too expensive for our requirements. The ideal would be a free open source tool but we could spend a bit on a license if it wasn't too expensive.Also, much of the starting corpus is already tagged with XML, just not OWL so if there are tools that can work with mapping XML to OWL that would be useful. 

2) Are there any good existing vocabularies that cover the space of scientific disciplines and/or authors and/or theories, concepts, etc.?

3) Does anyone have an opinion for how to model such a broad space? At first I was thinking create a few modular ontologies but the more I think of it the more I think there are going to be so many interconnections using one large ontology might be the way to go. Also, we've been looking at some impressive triple store products, that fit with our budget so I think one large ontology could scale up. 

4) Are there any existing tools that can take an ontology and do natural language or graphical type searching and browsing? I've seen a few things on the DBpedia research page that seem interesting and would be interested in pointers to other tools. It seems like a natural application of the technology and I don't want to re-invent the wheel. 

Any and all ideas would be appreciated. Feel free to contact me directly if you don't think this would be of interest to the whole list. 

Cheers,
Michael

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Re: Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

Luis Enrique Ramos García
In reply to this post by Michael DeBellis-2
Hi Michael, 

I feel that you could try with GATE, but perhaps you just know this tool. I have used it for NLP, tagging, and can be use to populate ontologies. That would be my first recommendation. 


Best regards


Luis Ramos

El mar., 18 feb. 2020 a las 18:30, Michael DeBellis (<[hidden email]>) escribió:
This isn't exactly a Protege question (although we are using Protege) but I thought this would be one of the best places to ask this question. I'm working with someone who wants to use an ontology to provide a Semantic Search tool for academic papers and other media (videos, audio lectures, etc.). We are focusing on a few specific authors and disciplines right now: Politics, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy but I think even with the media we already have they span so many overlapping disciplines (e.g., much of the Cognitive Science work has references to Biology and Anthropology) and there will be connections to other people and media at some point we are going to want to model almost all domains within the sciences (soft and hard) as well as Political Science and Philosophy. So I have 4 questions:

1) Are there any good tools to take a corpus of media (documents, videos, audio of lectures, etc.) and automatically match them against an OWL ontology? There is a commercial tool called Pool Party that seems to do this really well but it's too expensive for our requirements. The ideal would be a free open source tool but we could spend a bit on a license if it wasn't too expensive.Also, much of the starting corpus is already tagged with XML, just not OWL so if there are tools that can work with mapping XML to OWL that would be useful. 

2) Are there any good existing vocabularies that cover the space of scientific disciplines and/or authors and/or theories, concepts, etc.?

3) Does anyone have an opinion for how to model such a broad space? At first I was thinking create a few modular ontologies but the more I think of it the more I think there are going to be so many interconnections using one large ontology might be the way to go. Also, we've been looking at some impressive triple store products, that fit with our budget so I think one large ontology could scale up. 

4) Are there any existing tools that can take an ontology and do natural language or graphical type searching and browsing? I've seen a few things on the DBpedia research page that seem interesting and would be interested in pointers to other tools. It seems like a natural application of the technology and I don't want to re-invent the wheel. 

Any and all ideas would be appreciated. Feel free to contact me directly if you don't think this would be of interest to the whole list. 

Cheers,
Michael
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Re: Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

Michael DeBellis-2
In reply to this post by Lorenz Buehmann
Lorenz, thanks that is exactly the kind of thing I’m looking for. I thought there must be other people who have worked on this (or at least similar projects)  already and I would much rather leverage their work (and perhaps find ways to help each other) rather than reinvent the wheel. This isn’t a for profit project so we want to leverage and collaborate with others as much as possible. Thanks again for those pointers, they look very useful.

On Feb 18, 2020, at 11:07 PM, Lorenz Buehmann <[hidden email]> wrote:



Hi Michael,

not sure if this is what you're interested in, but a former colleague of mine, Prof. Sören Auer is doing a large project dubbed "Open Research Knowledge Graph" that might be related to your question, at TIB Hannover, Germany [1]. Maybe you can find some good resources there or even get in touch with those people.

Also, Dr. Sahar Vahdati [2] was working on Open Semantic Scholarly Data and there is an ongoing H2020 project called OpenAIRE [3].


Maybe useless pointers for you, but who knows.


[1] https://projects.tib.eu/orkg/
[2] http://sda.cs.uni-bonn.de/people/sahar-vahdati/
[3] https://www.openaire.eu/

On 18.02.20 18:29, Michael DeBellis wrote:
This isn't exactly a Protege question (although we are using Protege) but I thought this would be one of the best places to ask this question. I'm working with someone who wants to use an ontology to provide a Semantic Search tool for academic papers and other media (videos, audio lectures, etc.). We are focusing on a few specific authors and disciplines right now: Politics, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy but I think even with the media we already have they span so many overlapping disciplines (e.g., much of the Cognitive Science work has references to Biology and Anthropology) and there will be connections to other people and media at some point we are going to want to model almost all domains within the sciences (soft and hard) as well as Political Science and Philosophy. So I have 4 questions:

1) Are there any good tools to take a corpus of media (documents, videos, audio of lectures, etc.) and automatically match them against an OWL ontology? There is a commercial tool called Pool Party that seems to do this really well but it's too expensive for our requirements. The ideal would be a free open source tool but we could spend a bit on a license if it wasn't too expensive.Also, much of the starting corpus is already tagged with XML, just not OWL so if there are tools that can work with mapping XML to OWL that would be useful. 

2) Are there any good existing vocabularies that cover the space of scientific disciplines and/or authors and/or theories, concepts, etc.?

3) Does anyone have an opinion for how to model such a broad space? At first I was thinking create a few modular ontologies but the more I think of it the more I think there are going to be so many interconnections using one large ontology might be the way to go. Also, we've been looking at some impressive triple store products, that fit with our budget so I think one large ontology could scale up. 

4) Are there any existing tools that can take an ontology and do natural language or graphical type searching and browsing? I've seen a few things on the DBpedia research page that seem interesting and would be interested in pointers to other tools. It seems like a natural application of the technology and I don't want to re-invent the wheel. 

Any and all ideas would be appreciated. Feel free to contact me directly if you don't think this would be of interest to the whole list. 

Cheers,
Michael

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Re: Using An Ontology (or Ontologies) to Better Search for Academic papers

Alexander Garcia Castro
Hi all. We have the graph of scientific literature working with full text open access of PMC. We have done this using triplet stores as well as neo4J. We use bioportal annotation services for ontology based annotation and we developed our own ontology for modeling the strcutural elements of the paper (e.g. tittle, author, abstract, etc). all is available over git. Our experiences are reported in 


and 


Happy to proviede you with more details if needed. 

Best.  

On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 5:31 PM Michael DeBellis <[hidden email]> wrote:
Lorenz, thanks that is exactly the kind of thing I’m looking for. I thought there must be other people who have worked on this (or at least similar projects)  already and I would much rather leverage their work (and perhaps find ways to help each other) rather than reinvent the wheel. This isn’t a for profit project so we want to leverage and collaborate with others as much as possible. Thanks again for those pointers, they look very useful.

On Feb 18, 2020, at 11:07 PM, Lorenz Buehmann <[hidden email]> wrote:



Hi Michael,

not sure if this is what you're interested in, but a former colleague of mine, Prof. Sören Auer is doing a large project dubbed "Open Research Knowledge Graph" that might be related to your question, at TIB Hannover, Germany [1]. Maybe you can find some good resources there or even get in touch with those people.

Also, Dr. Sahar Vahdati [2] was working on Open Semantic Scholarly Data and there is an ongoing H2020 project called OpenAIRE [3].


Maybe useless pointers for you, but who knows.


[1] https://projects.tib.eu/orkg/
[2] http://sda.cs.uni-bonn.de/people/sahar-vahdati/
[3] https://www.openaire.eu/

On 18.02.20 18:29, Michael DeBellis wrote:
This isn't exactly a Protege question (although we are using Protege) but I thought this would be one of the best places to ask this question. I'm working with someone who wants to use an ontology to provide a Semantic Search tool for academic papers and other media (videos, audio lectures, etc.). We are focusing on a few specific authors and disciplines right now: Politics, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy but I think even with the media we already have they span so many overlapping disciplines (e.g., much of the Cognitive Science work has references to Biology and Anthropology) and there will be connections to other people and media at some point we are going to want to model almost all domains within the sciences (soft and hard) as well as Political Science and Philosophy. So I have 4 questions:

1) Are there any good tools to take a corpus of media (documents, videos, audio of lectures, etc.) and automatically match them against an OWL ontology? There is a commercial tool called Pool Party that seems to do this really well but it's too expensive for our requirements. The ideal would be a free open source tool but we could spend a bit on a license if it wasn't too expensive.Also, much of the starting corpus is already tagged with XML, just not OWL so if there are tools that can work with mapping XML to OWL that would be useful. 

2) Are there any good existing vocabularies that cover the space of scientific disciplines and/or authors and/or theories, concepts, etc.?

3) Does anyone have an opinion for how to model such a broad space? At first I was thinking create a few modular ontologies but the more I think of it the more I think there are going to be so many interconnections using one large ontology might be the way to go. Also, we've been looking at some impressive triple store products, that fit with our budget so I think one large ontology could scale up. 

4) Are there any existing tools that can take an ontology and do natural language or graphical type searching and browsing? I've seen a few things on the DBpedia research page that seem interesting and would be interested in pointers to other tools. It seems like a natural application of the technology and I don't want to re-invent the wheel. 

Any and all ideas would be appreciated. Feel free to contact me directly if you don't think this would be of interest to the whole list. 

Cheers,
Michael

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